Download The People Who Own Themselves: Aboriginal Ethnogenesis in a by Heather Devine PDF

By Heather Devine

The quest for a Métis id and what constitutes that identification is a key factor dealing with many Aboriginals of combined ancestry this day. The those who personal Themselves reconstructs 250 years of Desjarlais relations heritage throughout a considerable sector of North the USA, from colonial Louisiana, the St. Louis, Missouri quarter, and the yank Southwest to pink River and crucial Alberta. during tracing the Desjarlais kinfolk, social, financial, and political elements influencing the improvement of assorted Aboriginal ethnic identities are mentioned. With exciting information about Desjarlais kinfolk, this publication deals new, unique insights into the 1885 Northwest uprising, concentrating on kinship as a motivating consider the result of occasions. With a different how-to appendix for Métis genealogical reconstruction, this publication might be of equivalent curiosity to Métis eager to learn their very own family tree and to students engaged within the reconstruction of Métis ethnic identification.

Show description

Read Online or Download The People Who Own Themselves: Aboriginal Ethnogenesis in a Canadian Family, 1660-1900 PDF

Best canadian books

The People Who Own Themselves: Aboriginal Ethnogenesis in a Canadian Family, 1660-1900

The quest for a Métis id and what constitutes that id is a key factor dealing with many Aboriginals of combined ancestry this day. the folk Who personal Themselves reconstructs 250 years of Desjarlais kinfolk heritage throughout a considerable quarter of North the United States, from colonial Louisiana, the St. Louis, Missouri quarter, and the yank Southwest to purple River and critical Alberta.

Flying Canucks: Famous Canadian Aviators

Flying Canucks tells the attention-grabbing tale of aviation in Canada via this selection of 37 biographies of vital aviators in our nation's heritage. As early as 1908, having learn the Wright brothers' invention, alberta farm boys and mechanics in Quebec villages have been developing huge kites, trying to fly them.

A Twist of Orchids

3rd within the acclaimed “Death within the Dordogne” sequence. wintry weather within the Dordogne: scrumptious meals, ruggedly attractive surroundings, unscrupulous orchid hunters, unlawful medicines, a poetic house-breaker, and 3 mysterious deaths and counting . . . Expat Montrealer Mara Dunn and orchid-loving Brit Julian wooden live jointly in an uneasy, on-and-off manner.

Additional resources for The People Who Own Themselves: Aboriginal Ethnogenesis in a Canadian Family, 1660-1900

Example text

A problem that plagued the seigneurial system from its beginnings was the frequent absence of its seigneurs. Although the French government was extremely generous in its land grants to former military officers, the isolated colony offered few other attractions that might retain ambitious men. Consequently, many officers re- The Social Contexts of Europe and New France 33 turned to France rather than settle in a harsh wilderness with few creature comforts and almost no marriageable Frenchwomen. Both Jean-Maurice-Philippe de Vernon de La Fouille, captain of the La Fouille Company and Pierre Ferré de Lespinay, lieutenant of the La Fouille Company, chose to return to France after the Carignan-Salières Regiment was disbanded.

There were no known blood ties to complicate the union. 33 What more could a mother ask? The purpose of marriage in most early modern families, from the landed aristocracy to the peasantry, was to establish alliances that would accumulate, manage, divide, and transfer property in the most efficient and equitable way, for the purposes of maximizing the fortunes of one’s immediate and extended family. 34 Because the economic, social, and political implications of marriage were so significant, the authorities sought to exercise as much control over unions as possible.

Chapter 7 focuses on how Indian Department regulations and judicial practices in Northern Alberta in late 1885 served to manipulate the decision-making process of mixed-race treaty Indians, inducing them to withdraw from treaty voluntarily and accept scrip, and explores the experiences of different members of the Desjarlais family who withdrew from treaty after 1885. Their subsequent attempts at agriculture and their migration westward and northward into the Peace River country to take treaty or scrip is documented.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.57 of 5 – based on 33 votes